1987: Classification of the text 1998: Agreement on persons temporarily staying in Chad in the context of official missions related to humanitarian demining activities 2005: Agreement on the status of United States personnel in Chad The counter-treaty contains provisions relating to the criminal justice of Philippine personnel during residence in the United States. The agreement was reached in the form of an executive agreement and was not ratified by the U.S. Senate. According to the logic of Clifford`s District Court of Columbia, because the agreement would have to reduce the impact of U.S. jurisdiction, it would have to be ratified by the Senate to be constitutionally valid. However, the counter-treaty differs from SOFA with the Republic of Korea and SOFAs with other foreign jurisdictions in that the United States does not fully waive jurisdiction for offenses committed on U.S. territory. SOFAs are often part of a comprehensive security agreement with other types of military agreements (e.g. B basing, access and prepositioning). A SOFA may be based on authority contained in previous treaties, congressional actions, or single executive agreements that include the security agreement.

. . .

Comments are closed.